Thursday 08 Dec 2016

World Gone Mad
Jennifer Flaten

It is a world gone mad. Parents, willing to spend hundreds of dollars to get tickets to a Hannah Montana concert. When asked why they would do such a thing, their answer: they didn't want to disappoint their child. Imagine, spending what could amount to the mortgage payment because you didn't want to disappoint your child.

Here is another example, a woman who completely falsified an essay to win concert tickets. Her lie was a big one, she claimed the little girls father was killed in combat. After being caught in the lie the mother begged the contest officials not to punish her daughter. Again, this woman's claim was she didn't want to disappoint her daughter. Well, her daughter is going to be disappointed in a completely different way, as schoolmates tease her about her lying mother.

The daughter was six. Did this woman really think her daughter would hold it against her for the rest of her life? Chances are after she said no to her a couple of times the daughter would have forgotten all about it.

When did parents become unable to disappoint their children? When did it become necessary to be your child's best friend?

Your child has enough friends with in their peer group. They need parents to be parents. Provide love, stability and discipline. What they don't need are parents who give in to every whim, who show them that their happiness is above all else.

When parents max out a credit card giving the "ultimate" birthday party that just tells the child that they are the center of the universe. What comes next year after this years "ultimate' party. How do these parents intend to keep up?

Lets face it as parents, our job is to let kids know there will always be someone who has more. We need to make the most of what we got, not spend our time trying to compete with others.

There are even cases of parents stepping in and getting involved in physical altercations for their children. No one wants their child bullied, but as an adult you cannot go up to the bully and punch him. This makes you a criminal.

Teachers see this everyday. A parent calls enraged because the child has come home story of how the teacher mistreated him. Instead, of asking questions to find out the true story-since children are notorious exaggerators. Parents, get on the phone with the Principal, the media, and law enforcement. Blowing a simple situation out of proportion.

Of course, a parent should do everything necessary to protect their children. That doesn't mean you should abandon your common sense. If you child does something wrong, then they should face the punishment. If you child refuses to obey the school dress code they will get disciplined. What you should do is offer a sympathetic shoulder to cry on, you will commiserate about the evil school district. What you should not do is sue the school district over their disciplinary action.

Parents who do everything for their children are doing them no favors. All they are creating is helpless individuals who have a sense of entitlement. How exactly are these kids going to make it out in the big bad word, without their parents?

Luckily, this is easy to correct. Parents need to once again gain control. Become the parent and not the best friend. Stop giving into your child's every whim. Accept the fact that sometimes you child is going to be mad at you. They will occasionally, accuse you of ruining their life. It is okay, it will pass.

Jennifer Flaten lives where the local delicacy is fried cheese, Wisconsin. She writes about family life, its amusing or not so amusing moments. "At least it's not another article on global warming," she says. Jennifer bakes a mean banana bread and admits an unusual attraction to balloon animals and cup cakes. Busy preparing for the zombie apocalypse, she stills finds time to write "As I See It," her witty, too often true column. "My urge to write," says Jennifer, "is driven by my love of cupcakes, with sprinkles on top. Who wouldn't write for cupcakes, with sprinkles," she wonders.

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